Monday,  March 30, 2020  8:30 AM to 9:30 AM

Welcome and Keynote Presentation

 

 

Monday,  March 30, 2020  10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions

A1 – Assistive Technology with Children who have Visual Impairment and Complex Needs including Cortical/Cerebral Visual Impairment  

No handout

By Tammy Bruegger, OTD, M.S.Ed, OTR/L, ATP, The Children's Center for the Visually Impaired and Rockhurst University

 

More than 80% of learning occurs through vision. In children with visual impairment, visual loss can impact development and occupation. Early intervention is critical to provide exposure to alternative methods and assistive technology to facilitate play, learning, communication and concept development. For children with complex needs and cortical/cerebral visual impairment specialized assessment and intervention strategies are needed. Solutions and strategies to access literacy, reading, writing, development of visual skills and use of residual vision will be presented. Accessibility features of tactile graphics, Braille, eye gaze, software, apps, and hardware will be reviewed. Bring case studies to brainstorm possible AT solutions.

 

A2  – Who is the Heavy Weight Champion? An AAC Accessibility Comparison: iOS vs. Windows

No handout

By Shawna Dunnaway, OT, ATP, AAC Consultant for Forbes

 

In the red corner, featuring recently improved accessibility options and improved access for all, is the very lightweight Apple iOS. In the blue corner, flexing its Grid 3 software and other software driven computer access controls, is Windows, an old and familiar contender. This session will compare and contrast the various accessibility features and alternative access solutions found in both AAC heavyweights leading you to be the judge of which system has the features that best match your needs.

 

A3  – Using Technology to Develop Transferable Job Skills for Students who are Blind / VI 

No handout

By Pam Arbeiter, TSVI/COMS, and Julie Ituarte, TSVI/COMS, Kansas School for the Blind

Participants will learn ways to include students who are blind & visually impaired in STEM instruction through the use of technology. This session will focus on coding modules, Makerspace and entrepreneurship opportunities developed at the Kansas State School for the Blind. The focus will be on helping participants identify ways to develop similar programs in their local area.

 

A4 –   Tweaking the Workplace

No handout

By Bethany Baldwin, B.A., and Steven Long, ICAN of Arkansas

 

This session will review workplace accommodations and the support within: review of rights to be an advocate, process of requesting accommodations, cost-effective outcomes rather than replacing employees, exploration of disabilities, and readily available Assistive Technology to support necessary goals of employment of individuals with disabilities.

 

 

A5 – Creating Access

No handout

By Scout Merry, B.S., Program Coordinator, Missouri Assistive Technology

Put your creative hat on and brace yourself for fun at this engaging make-it-and-take-it session.

 

A6 – AAC Implementation Playground

No handout

By Betsy Clifford SLP and Gretchen Bright SLP, AAC Consultants for Saltillo Corporation


This session will be a "playground" for participants to explore a variety of tools offered by PRC-Saltillo to support AAC implementation. Given the advancements in and increased access to technology, a wide variety of AAC solutions are available. Although hardware and software are ever changing, the need for quality therapeutic and classroom support remains constant. Language learning activities within a classroom, as well as the routine opportunities to interact, are the most natural conditions for a student who uses an AAC system/device to learn. The challenge for the educational team is how to integrate classroom activities so that the student is able to learn academic skills, participate in conversational routines, and learn to use their AAC system, create implementation materials and begin to address the challenge of implementing AAC. Participants will have hands on experience with implementation tools (e.g., ChatEditor, PASS Software, ExploreAAC, and AAC Language Lab) to help address the challenges of implementing AAC.NOTE: this session will be capped at 50 people.

 

A7  -  iOS and Voice Over

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By Denny Huff and Rita Howells


Apple devices running iOS software and VoiceOver are truly a life changing technology that has had a significant impact for people with visual impairments. The things that persons who are blind can now do with their iPhones are almost endless.

 


 

Monday, March 30, 2020 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions

B1 – Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) 

No handout

By  Cady Macfee, Customer Relationship Manager and Christopher Ludvigsen, Outreach Specialist, Missouri Relay

 

RCC is a free service available for Missouri residents who are deaf or hard of hearing to actively participate in a multi-party teleconference or web conferences calls by reading captions through a web browser or mobile device.

B2 –    Considerations for AAC across the Phases of CVI 

No handout

By Pamela Shatto, B.S., M.A., SLP, Children's Center for the Visually Impaired

 

This presentation will give an overview of the emerging evidence on diagnostic and visual strategies for students with cortical visual impairment (CVI). Emphasis for using and adapting augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices and practices in early childhood settings will be described and demonstrated across the three phases of CVI. The presenter will compare distinctive features of common AAC devices to visual skills associated with the three phases to assist parents and professionals with AAC decision making in early education.

 

B3 – Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale for Children 

No handout

By Dr. Bob Cunningham, Director of the Maryville University Occupational Therapy Program, ATP and owner of Cunningham Consulting LLC.

 

This presentation will report on the Children’s Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scales (C-PIADS), a 15-item, self-report questionnaire designed to assess the effects an assistive technology device has on a child’s quality of life (QOL). Based on the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scales (PIADS) developed by Jutai and Day (2002), the C-PIADS utilizes a five point “Smiley Face” scale and short phrases to assess the same three constructs as the PIADS (competence, adaptability and self-esteem). The C-PIADS has good reliability and internal consistency and demonstrates significant potential for being part of a comprehensive assistive technology outcomes assessment for children.

 

B4 – My Path, My Profession, My AT: Secrets to Success as a Professional with a Disability

No handout

By Jason Hartsfield, Starkloff Disability Institute

 

People with disabilities are not often seen in competitive workplaces for a variety of reasons. First, they face huge barriers to employment including bias, discrimination, socioeconomic disadvantages, limited access to transportation and buildings. When a disabled worker makes their way into a workplace, how can they be successful, especially if they work with adaptive technology as an accommodation? A panel of professionals with disabilities discusses their journey into the workplace, their request for adaptive technology accommodations, and how they make it work.

 

B5  – SWITCHED Adapted Toys

B5 PPT

By Dana Chole and Rachel Hughes, pediatric physical therapists, Tiger Intensive Program at the Children's Therapy Center

 

Presenters will share information on SWITCHED Adapted Toys, an organization striving to make play possible for all kids. Resources and information on learning how to adapt toys will be provided. Discussion will focus on the importance of play, research findings regarding switch toys, and how to get started adapting toys. A tutorial on how to adapt a toy will also be demonstrated.

 

B6 - How Parenting Helps Us Grow As Allies

No handout

By Jen Lee Reeves, co-founder and executive director, Born Just Right

 

Most adults who have a connection to disability come into the experience as a parent or caregiver. Born Just Right's Jen Lee Reeves explains her evolution as a disability ally and tips for listening and supporting the disability community.

B7  - DeafBlind Resources - MO Support Service Provider (SSP) Program and iCanConnect

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By Christina Godinez, Sarah Kurtz, Sharon Ryan, Beth Jordan, Amy Rowson

 

There are two vital services for individuals who are DeafBlind in Missouri, the SSP (Service Support Provider) program and the national iCanConnect program.  This session will cover both services, and individuals who utilize them will share their experiences.  Presenters will briefly describe the diversity of the DeafBlind culture for a more basic/general understanding of the DeafBlind community.  Certified SSP trainers and participants will walk attendees through the program features, role of the SSP, what can and cannot be provided, the eligibility, and how consumers are utilizing the SSP program. SSP participants are often also recipients of iCanConnect technology, which they use to request SSP support and schedule service.   iCanConnect provides distance communication technology to eligible individuals with both hearing and vision loss.  Participants of the program will provide insight regarding the life-changing effects of technology and will answer questions on the iCanConnect program. 

 


 

 

Monday, March 30, 2020 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Concurrent Sessions

C1 – I Want to Call You, But My Speech ...

No handout

By Cady MacFee, Missouri Relay, Shannon Smith, M.P.A.,, Teltex, Inc, and Justin Palmer, ATOS Medical

 

This session is great for individuals who have speech difficulty, SLPs, and those who may have family, friends, co-workers or know persons who struggle to make and receive calls because of their ability or inability to communicate by phone. We will focus on how to make calls using different types of technology and answer questions like: What is a TeliTalk and who's it for? Relay is more than TTYs, what's available? What about smart technology and making calls? Demonstrations of equipment or how to use the service will be made where possible.

 

C2 – Multidisciplinary Approach to Assistive Technology 

No handout

By Jessica Nicolaescu, OT, Children's Therapy Center, and Cynthia Jacob, M.S., Children's Therapy Center.

 

Take a holistic look at settings, modifications, and system characteristics to consider when choosing and programming an AAC device for a child. Occupational therapists and speech therapists will discuss their role in AAC evaluations, including determining optimal access methods, systems/forms of AAC, and comparing language software available for speech generating devices.

 

C3 – Tech Time: Integration of Assistive Technology Into the Classroom

C3 PDF

By Tammy Bruegger, OTD, M.S.Ed, OTR/L, ATP, The Children's Center for the Visually Impaired and Rockhurst University

 

In children with visual impairment and other complex needs, assistive technology provides access and increases participation in learning, literacy, leisure, play, communication and socialization throughout the school day. However, the integration of the technology into classroom activities can be difficult. Use of universal design for learning can help provide opportunities for all students to participate in learning. It may be a challenge to train staff in the use of AT, but it is necessary for effective integration of technology. Through the use of a “Tech Time” class within a classroom, assistive technology practitioners, occupational therapists, special educators/regular educators, speech pathologists and teachers of the visually impaired can collaborate and train staff and students to integrate technology in daily learning and play activities. According to Smith and co-authors (2018), “Work within a multidisciplinary team provides opportunities for task shifting, with the appropriate mix of knowledge and skills to achieve AT related outcomes”. Through various lessons, children who have different needs can learn access that can transfer to other literacy times in the school day and also transfer to the home environment.

 

C4  – Tips & Hacks for Employment of People with Disabilities

C4 WORD
   C4 PDF

By Lori Becker and Jason Hartsfield, Starkloff Disability Institute

 

Are you helping individuals with a disability to find a job? Or assisting a friend, relative, or yourself? Where are the jobs? Where are the resources to help with the job search for people with disabilities, and how do you access them? What are some tips and hacks to make your job successful once you get it? The Starkloff Disability Institute will share tips and life hacks to make the employment search and job successful, while sharing about their trainings and camps available as a state and federal vendor of employment services.

 

C5  – Build Your Own Body Mod! (Empowerment through prototyping and design)

C5 WORD1   C5 WORD2      C5 WORD3    

C5 PDF1     C5 PDF2    C5 PDF3

By Kate Ganim, Senior Program Manager and Founder of BOOST Workshops and Jen Reeves, Co-Founder of Born Just Right

 

Learn how to support kids with disabilities in designing and prototyping their own body modifications and solutions. This will be an active, hands-on session where we explore an approach based in empowerment. This session is based on BOOST by Born Just Right (previously Superhero Cyborgs): the workshop that gave rise to Jordan Reeves' Project Unicorn and other youth projects that have received national acclaim.

C6 – How to Incorporate Assistive Technology at Home and In The Community 

C6 WORD    C6 PPT

By Katie Threlkeld, SLP, Whitley Bieser, M.A., CCC-SLP, MU , Megan Henzel MOT, OTR/L, ATP of Children's Hospital Therapy Center

This session will provide important family education materials about assistive technology; identify opportunities within one's environment for use of assistive technology; and provide activities for families to do within their everyday lives to incorporate assistive technology.

C7  -  What Would You Like To Do: Your Computer With Jaws and Leasey 

C7 PPT

By Brett Wilhelm owner of Wilhelm's AT Services

 

Leasey is an add-on for the Jaws for Windows screen reader designed to simplify computers and screen readers for beginner users, and make common tasks performed by advanced users easier and faster.

 


 

 

Monday, March 30, 2020 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions

 

D1 – iPad as a Computer Replacement: Revolutionary Features of iPad OS

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By Jim Fettgather, computer instructor, and Becky Dumsky, Alphapointe

 

In 2010, Apple introduced the iPad, which revolutionized productivity for the tablet environment. Now, 360 million iPads and nine years later, Apple has again re-imagined the iPad completely with its own operating system and incredible new capabilities. In this session, participants will learn about the following new features:

  • Slide-Over and Split-Screen view to run multiple apps simultaneously
  • Copy and paste text between applications
  • Voice Control—use your voice to navigate hands-free every aspect of operating your iPad
  • Connect peripherals such as USB flash drives, SD cards, keyboard or external monitor

Participants will be able to see first-hand how the iPad can finally be considered a potential computer replacement for the classroom or the work setting.

 

D2 – Bridging the Gap Between No-Tech/Low-Tech and High-Tech AAC

No handout

By Glenn Dobbs owner of LoganTech and developer of Logan ProxTalker

 

For some students there is no straight line from low-tech AAC like picture cards and charts to high-tech AAC including dynamic communication devices. In the past these students would be subjected to years of repetitive therapy to make small but meaningful progress, resulting in a large output of an SLP’s time, resources and money spent on leveled AAC products along the way. Logan ProxTalker and ProxPAD, designed especially for children with moderate to severe language and communication delays, can help bridge this gap and are flexible enough to meet the student’s needs as they progress toward higher-functioning AAC devices.

 

D3 – AT Solutions are a Moving Target: Strategies for Building Skills  

No handout

By Darren Gabbert and Jennifer Thornhill, Adaptive Computing Technology Center at University of Missouri

 

Attendees will explore how various types of assistive technology solutions can help change lives. Various assistive technology tools and strategies will guide educators, support professionals, case workers, guardians and individuals through early exploration of AT to more advanced usage and communication mediums. Through a case study, research and real-life examples, attendees will walk away with a variety of AT solutions and methods to help them enhance the lives of loved ones or individuals they support.

D4 – Disability Disclosure Planning for Job Seekers with Disabilities

D4 PPT

By Jason Hartsfield, Starkloff Disability Institute

 

Disclosing a disability to a potential or current employer can be a significant source of anxiety. What someone says, when they say it, and who they say it to, all depends on the specific nature of the disability and the nature of the job. Starkloff Career Academy presents a step-by-step process for developing a disability disclosure strategy for both job seekers and current employers.

 

D5 – Build Your Own Body Mod! (Empowerment through prototyping and design)

Handouts are found under C5 session listing above

By Kate Ganim, Senior Program Manager and Founder of BOOST Workshops and Jen Reeves, Co-Founder of Born Just Right

 

Learn how to support kids with disabilities in designing and prototyping their own body modifications and solutions. This will be an active, hands-on session where we explore an approach based in empowerment. This session is based on BOOST by Born Just Right (previously Superhero Cyborgs): the workshop that gave rise to Jordan Reeves' Project Unicorn and other youth projects that have received national acclaim.

 

 

D6 –   MoAT Advisory Council Meeting 

No handout

By David Baker, Director, Missouri Assistive Technology

 

Attendees are invited to participate in this open meeting of the Missouri Assistive Technology Advisory Council. We want to hear from you ways we can further enhance the ability of Missourians to learn about and acquire assistive technology.

 

D7  - ASR only IPCTS - Next Generation Captioning

D7 PPT

By Jon Gray, B.A.Sc,  Business Manager for CaptionMate

 

Computers have finally reached the point in our society where they surpass humans in many everyday tasks. Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology is now faster and in many cases more accurate than human captionists and/or transcriptionists in providing real time captions for individuals with hearing loss.

 


 

Tuesday, March 31, 2020 8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions

E1 – Math Teaching Techniques For the Blind

No handout

By Paige Sears, Metropolitan Community College

 

This session will feature a demonstration of how to use a combination of Duxbury, SWIFT and Math Type to convert math documents into readable Nemeth Braille, along with an overview of Tactile Graphics. Also included will be a brief tutorial on the Braille alphabet and Nemeth number 0 through 9.        

   

E2 – Working with Progressive Conditions: Benefits of Flexible AAC 

No handout

By Meagan Koeneman, Sales Director Control Bionic


Progressive neurodegenerative diseases like Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) pose a unique communication challenge to not only the patients, but also their surrounding team of clinicians and caregivers. In this session we will discuss these challenges and address the many benefits the latest flexible AAC solution from Control Bionics, the NeuroNode Trilogy.

The NeuroNode Trilogy combines three access methods in one funded solution. As the client’s condition changes over time, so does their method of access. In an effort to maintain the highest level of communication speed and the lowest level of user fatigue Control Bionics has designed a lifetime solution for this unique patient population.

 

E3 – AccessALLbility Features  

E3 PPT

By Lisa Meyer, SLP, Instructional Coordinator for Technology, and Kara Winnike, SLP and Assistive Technology Specialist, North Kansas City School District

 

This session will help educators uncover the transformative and empowering accessibility features that are built into all Apple devices.

 

E4 – Making PDFs Less Horrible 

No handout

By Kevin Lanahan , Missouri Department of Conservation, Web Accessibility Advocate

 

PDFs are horrible, but institutions can't seem to quit them. Here's how to make them less horrible for assistive technology users.

 

E5 –   Home Modifications for Accessibility

No handout

By Bryon Sunday, Owner of Accessibility Remodeling

 

Learn about different ways to modify your home for independent living, care giving and special needs.

 

E6 – Consumer Support Provider Update for TAP-I and iCanConnect 

No handout

By Brenda Whitlock, MoAT Program Coordinator

 

TAP for Internet and iCanConnect certifiers and trainers will gain updated program information and share training tips from across Missouri. Program equipment and mini software demos will be provided.

E7  -  Label On! Strategies for Families to Promote Independent Living!

E7 PPT

By Kevin Hollinger, Certified AT Instructional Specialist, Certified O&M Specialist and National Board Certified Teacher in Visual Impairments, Francis Howell School District

 

Label On! Strategies for Families to Promote Independent Living! strives to introduce families to systems of organization for managing household items. This interactive training will begin with a review of Large Print/Braille and audio labeling systems and resources which promote independence among persons with visual impairment. Participants will then move through the scope and sequence for labeling while discussing pre-requisite skills and strategies to increase confidence through experience. The training will culminate an interactive session to practice “no tech,” “low tech,” and “high tech” options to help each family compare and contrast labeling systems and how to identify a starting point that seems best for them. This training will include information on tactile labels, tactile markers, label makers, audio labels, bar code readers, and more.

 


 

Tuesday, March 31, 2020 9:30 AM to 10:30 AM

Concurrent Sessions

F1 – Accessibility @Microsoft

F1 WORD1       F1 WORD2

F1 PDF1           F1 PDF2

By Debbie Vinton-Meier and Jonah Levine is a Technology Specialist from Microsoft.

 

Empowering Everyone to Achieve More.

 

F2 – Literacy and AAC 

F2 PPT

By Tara Wineinger, Park Hill School District  

 

Learn how the Park Hill School District adapts books and creates enhanced "read alouds" to provide students with complex learning needs access to rich literature to develop emerging readers.

 

F3 – Support of Available Assistive Technology within Education 

No handout

By Bethany Baldwin, B.A., and Steven Long, ICAN of Arkansas

 

A basic synopsis of how Assistive Technology (AT) came to be within education, review of laws provided to uphold the goal of what AT encompasses, and show of readily available AT to be utilized within education. Emphasis on Educational Apps in an "Appy Hour" and show n' tell fashion will be provided for hands on experimentation with iPads.

 

 

F4 – Purrfectly Accessible Word Documents 

F4 PPT

By Eileen Belton, M.A., Program Coordinator, Missouri Assistive Technology, and Lainie Strange, Web Developer/Web Accessibility Coordinator, State of Missouri

 

Building an accessible MS Word document gets easier with the latest version of MS Word.  This one hour session will offer a quick overview on how to create an accessible MS Word document using MS 2016.  It will also offer participants a trick to recall the key factors in creating an accessible MS Word document.  

F5 – Promoting AT in Supported Living  

No handout

By Angie Perryman and Elizabeth Obrey, Family Advocates and Community Resource Specialists, The Arc of the Ozarks

 

Attendees will take a fresh look at how all types of supported living can reach a new level of independence by identifying needs for support through evaluating personal strengths, the living environment and tasks to be done. Furthermore, attendees will find out the most effective assistive technology that promotes the highest level of independence. Session will include a look at a wide range of assistive technology.

 

F6 – Technology Changed My Life

F6 WORD

By Lisa Turner, Licensed Professional Counselor, Missouri Inclusive Housing Development Corporation, and Panel

 

Panel presentation by individuals who use technology in their daily lives. Panel members may also include family members and providers who support individuals who utilize technology.

 

F7  - Showcase Your Instruction - Become a Certified Assistive Technology Instructional Specialist 

No handout

By Kevin Hollinger, Certified AT Instructional Specialist, Certified O&M Specialist and National Board Certified Teacher in Visual Impairments, Francis Howell School District

 

This session describes how to become a Certified Assistive Technology Instructional Specialist through the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP). A history of all certifications available through ACVREP will preview the newest of CATIS. Attendees will explore the Scope of Practice, Body of Knowledge, Applied Competencies, Internships, a review of University Personnel Preparation Programs and much more. Come learn how you can showcase your instruction and collaboration by seeking ATIS certification.

 

 

Tuesday, March 31, 2020 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Concurrent Sessions

G1 – Google Chromebook Accessibility 

No handout

By David Baker, Director of Missouri Assistive Technology

 

 

G2 – AAC Implementation Playground

No handout

By Betsy Clifford SLP and Gretchen Bright SLP, AAC Consultants for Saltillo Corporation


This session will be a "playground" for participants to explore a variety of tools offered by PRC-Saltillo to support AAC implementation. Given the advancements in and increased access to technology, a wide variety of AAC solutions are available. Although hardware and software are ever changing, the need for quality therapeutic and classroom support remains constant. Language learning activities within a classroom, as well as the routine opportunities to interact, are the most natural conditions for a student who uses an AAC system/device to learn. The challenge for the educational team is how to integrate classroom activities so that the student is able to learn academic skills, participate in conversational routines, and learn to use their AAC system, create implementation materials and begin to address the challenge of implementing AAC. Participants will have hands on experience with implementation tools (e.g., ChatEditor, PASS Software, ExploreAAC, and AAC Language Lab) to help address the challenges of implementing AAC.NOTE: this session will be capped at 50 people.

 

 

G3 – Utilizing AAC Strategies and Supports to Foster Spontaneous Communication in Emergent Communicators

No handout

By Kristen Ponce, SLP, Park Hill School District

For students who use AAC to communicate, the goal is for them to become competent and independent communicators. In order for our students to grow into spontaneous communicators, we not only have to engineer an environment that allows them many opportunities to communicate, but we also need to provide them with language rich instruction. This session will address how to scaffold language instruction based on developmental skill level; how to incorporate language instruction and communication opportunities throughout the day; and how to adapt activities to encourage participation from AAC users.

 

G4 – Can You Do It in the Dark: Making Your Social Media Accessible 

No handout

By Justin Romack is an Assistive Technology Coordinator and accessibility champion for Texas A&M University

 

Have you ever "looked" at your social media through the eyes of someone who can’t see? Do you know how screen reading apps and other assistive technologies parse what you do on the web? Making your work accessible means more than checking off a few boxes to fulfill ADA requirements. This session will look at some best-case (and worst-case) scenarios of how your social media outreach can be more accessible, and provide tips to ensure you’re reaching all users – each and every time you post to the web.

 

 

G5 –Read This!  Comparing the Tools That Help us Read

No handout

By Suzie Wiley, OTR of Ability KC

 

This session will highlight the features of 3 Windows applications we frequently encounter for text to speech (TTS) reading for individuals with learning disabilities – Read & Write, Kurzweil and Snap & Read. How to support a user and family in the use of the TTS application is as critical as the ease of use for the professional, but an area that may be overlooked. Likewise application on Chromebooks vs. desktop system, or what is being read may indicate the best fit for a user. Participants will leave with a greater understanding of the processes for both applications that are required not only for the end user but for the technology ‘support team’ at home.

 

G6 – Living Safely In The Community Using Remote Supports

No handout

By Duane Tempel Owner , Night Owl Support Systems


This session will provide an overview of ways to live safely in the community using Remote Supports.

 

 

G7 – Can You Hear Me?

No handout

By Bethany Baldwin, B.A. and Steven Long of ICAN of Arkansas

 

This session will be focused on bringing forth more attention to hearing loss and all that it encompasses; including knowledge of types of hearing loss (experimentation of how it is to 'hear' with a loss), how to handle situations, and showcasing Assistive Technology (AT) geared towards those with hearing loss.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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